WHAT’S BEEN HAPPENING?

Building background knowledge, establishing contacts and meeting relevant people.

20 February 2019

AGM and General Meeting: Appointed committee members: Jan Star, Jenny Budd, Ric Sambell and Vicky Kerfoot. Raised proximity of Alcoa mining; lack of local knowledge. Agreed need to build community support, educating and informing value of forests.

27 March 2019

Met with Hon Diane Evers MLC for South West Region; and advisers. Also present: Frank Batini, Environmental Spokesperson WA Institute of Foresters of Australia and John Clarke, formerly worked for FPC

4 July 2019

Visit with Minister Dawson and Matthew Swinbourn MLC. Walked in the pouring rain, saw the benefits that forests do provide our community, and saw how difficult to walk through Alcoa replanting is.

5 August 2019

Alcoa Neighbour Relations meeting: Tabled maps of current mining and discussed the pre-mining of Myara North. This is where drilling for ore samples is taking place now. We were advised that the ore grade where they are currently mining is very good, and as better mining techniques have come into operation the need to mine has extended out another year and this may delay moving into Myara North (2025). When Alcoa do the pre-mining – they are constrained by waterline, cultural areas, black cockatoo trees, significant indigenous areas, rail lines would be protected, do not mine on tops of hills or streamlines and will honour a formal trail if it is used frequently – may be closed 5 month and rebuilt bigger and better.

Mining Tours – Alcoa encourage local community to take the tours and see the rehabilitation. They do give money to DBCA for ‘forest enhancement’.

Our concerns raised: Once cleared what happens to the timber, both viable commercial value and waste; FPC and Simcoa use it. We did stress the recreational demands of the increasing population, not just SJ. Hiking (bushwalking and trail running) not possible in mined areas.

23 August 2019

Hon M Swinbourn and Morena Evans, Electorate Officer. Discussed way forward. Are assisting to get meetings/engagement with Ministers Bill Johnson – Mining; Dave Kelly – Water and Forestry, Mick Murray – Sport and Recreation. 

Revitalising website – thank you Mill Street Creative.

Vision Statement
Engaged with bushwalking community, specifically WalksGPS, Dave Osborne.

4 September 2019

Meeting with Frank Batini, Environmental Spokesperson WA Institute of Foresters of Australia. Frank explained the new Biodiversity Act includes threatened ecological communities and special value. Define a threatening process: bauxite mining on high-value Jarrah forest.  Frank has given the approval to use the IFA Statement on Bauxite Mining.

Jarrahdale Community Collective Meeting. Jan and Vicky gave a report on action taken to date during 2019. There was some interest from JCC members. One member has helped by investigating the health benefits of forests. HUMI

29 October 2019

Meeting at Office of Hon Bill Johnston, MLA with Neil Roberts, Chief of Staff, David Alexander, Principal Policy Advisor and Dave Coggin, Principal Policy Advisor for Mark McGowan. Jan gave the briefing emphasising the unique nature of a hardwood forest in a Mediterranean Climate JFP claim that Alcoa is systematically cutting down the best forest. Alcoa assures us they are regrowing the forest but rehab is not the same as the natural forest. In the absence of bauxite, it is questionable if large jarrahs will ever grow. In addition, the genetic stock is diminished. JFP was advised to write to Premier with a copy to Minister Johnston’s office requesting access to the Mining Management Planning Liaison Group (MMPLG) that oversees the operations.

6 November 2019

Meeting with Tim Clifford MLC Member for the East Metropolitan Region and Talitha Wolfe, Research Officer. Following a briefing on the issues, we drove Tim and Talitha to Mundlimup, Strlinglia Road. Prescribed burning was taking place so unable to demonstrate the state of the rehabilitated forest not good for walking. Then down Blue Rock checking where Alcoa has actually drilled and also some good thinned forest. Got out to look at a couple of good trees and also where FPC had logged last time 2016.

Tim agreed to look into the State Agreement, raise the issue of a review and would ask questions in Parliament.

28 November 2019

Met with Minister Hon Dave Kelly MLA Minister for Water; Fisheries, Forestry; Innovation and ICT; Science and Luke Clarke, Principal Policy Advisor (Forests). We raised concerns about the treatment of the forest, illegal firewood and dumping. Hon Dave Kelly noted that the Regional Forest Agreement is the ‘head power’. If something is compliant under the Forest Management Plan 2014- 2023, it does not need to be checked under the EPBC Act. This is up for negotiation in 2023. Discussed Water Corp and catchment issues. Offered to take a tour and show him the area and the constraints.

Noted Djarlma Plan for WA Forestry Industry, we are engaged with possible thinning trial sites
The State Agreement raised.
We were advised to elevate the issues, raise public awareness.

3 December 2019

Met with Lisa Harvey and Alyssa Hayden. Gave an overview of our concerns, showing the extent of mining in the area. Advised to keep communication lines open.

9 December 2019

Met with Gail Black, Alcoa Neighbour Relations. Agreed to organise 2 tours. Tour 1 – JFP to set course for Brett Hodges to view the ‘constraints’, to allow 4 hours.
Tour 2 Gail to arrange a specific tour for the community emphasis on mining and rehab with Sue Nancarrow and Susannah Beech.

We emphasised the advantages science and education; Tourism Strategy of the Shire as well as passive use of the forest.

The forests of the 21st century will be valued most significantly for their natural beauty, biodiversity, flora and fauna habitat, passive recreation, bush walks, tracks and trails, clean water, as well as for their aesthetic, cultural and spiritual benefits.

We acknowledge the Aboriginal people as the Traditional Owners of this land and we pay our respects to Elders past and present.

The forests of the 21st century will be valued most significantly for their natural beauty, biodiversity, flora and fauna habitat, passive recreation, bush walks, tracks and trails, clean water, as well as for their aesthetic, cultural and spiritual benefits.

We acknowledge the Aboriginal people as the Traditional Owners of this land and we pay our respects to Elders past and present.