SAVE OUR JARRAH

PRESERVE THE NORTHERN JARRAH FORESTS’ ECOLOGY FOR THE BENEFIT OF OUR COMMUNITY AND FUTURE GENERATIONS.

SAVE OUR JARRAH

PRESERVE THE NORTHERN JARRAH FORESTS’S ECOLOGY FOR THE BENEFIT OF OUR COMMUNITY AND FUTURE GENERATIONS.

WE HAVE THE POWER TO IMPACT OUR FUTURE, AND WE’RE DOING SOMETHING ABOUT IT

Google map of Myara and Jarrahdale – plight area (the yellow area south of Jarrahdale) is where Alcoa is currently mining bauxite.

Map of Jarrahdale Forest

The Northern Jarrah Forest is in imminent risk of losing important biodiversity, cultural and heritage values. Save Our Jarrah strives to protect a large section of the Northern Jarrah Forest near Jarrahdale, Western Australia for future generations.

The natural, cultural, environmental and economic attributes and characteristics of this small area of the Northern Jarrah Forest is worthy of recognition, protection and preservation.  Values that are highlighted by the proximity aspects of tourism, a range of trails activity, equestrian pursuits, honey production, value added timber production, stream zone and water retention assets.

These assets are reflective of the appreciation the local and Western Australian community has for this area and it should be quarantined from any future mining and traditional logging operations. Some of the groups, organisations and areas adversely affected by mining and traditional logging are:

  • Walking and cycling Groups
  • Orienteering and equestrian groups
  • Local and WA history attributes
  • Wildflower and honey producers
  • Fine furniture Loggers, makers or producers
  • Environmental and scientific groups
  • Landcare
  • Stream Zone and Water Protection
  • Amenity and Safety

Save Our Jarrah represented by the Jarrahdale Forest Protectors and supported by the broader local and Western Australian community are seeking an exemption from Alcoa’s mining operations for the area ‘Myara North’.

WE HAVE THE POWER TO IMPACT OUR FUTURE, AND WE’RE DOING SOMETHING ABOUT IT

Map of Jarrahdale & surrounds.

Google map of Myara and Jarrahdale – plight area (yellow) is where Alcoa is currently mining bauxite.

The Northern Jarrah Forest is in imminent risk of losing important biodiversity, cultural and heritage values. Save Our Jarrah strives to protect a large section of the Northern Jarrah Forest near Jarrahdale, Western Australia for future generations.

The natural, cultural, environmental and economic attributes and characteristics of this small area of the Northern Jarrah Forest is worthy of recognition, protection and preservation.  Values that are highlighted by the proximity aspects of tourism, a range of trails activity, equestrian pursuits, honey production, value added timber production, stream zone and water retention assets.

These assets are reflective of the appreciation the local and Western Australian community has for this area and it should be quarantined from any future mining and traditional logging operations. Some of the groups, organisations and areas adversely affected by mining and traditional logging are:

  • Walking and cycling Groups
  • Orienteering and equestrian groups
  • Local and WA history attributes
  • Wildflower and honey producers
  • Fine furniture Loggers, makers or producers
  • Environmental and scientific groups
  • Landcare
  • Stream Zone and Water Protection
  • Amenity and Safety

Save Our Jarrah represented by the Jarrahdale Forest Protectors and supported by the broader local and Western Australian community are seeking an exemption from Alcoa’s mining operations for the area ‘Myara North’.

How You Can Help

New supporters will receive a welcome email when they sign-up, and additional emails sent thereafter updating the progress of the campaign.

The forests of the 21st century will be valued most significantly for their natural beauty, biodiversity, flora and fauna habitat, passive recreation, bush walks, tracks and trails, clean water, as well as for their aesthetic, cultural and spiritual benefits.

We acknowledge the Aboriginal people as the Traditional Owners of this land and we pay our respects to Elders past and present.

The forests of the 21st century will be valued most significantly for their natural beauty, biodiversity, flora and fauna habitat, passive recreation, bush walks, tracks and trails, clean water, as well as for their aesthetic, cultural and spiritual benefits.

We acknowledge the Aboriginal people as the Traditional Owners of this land and we pay our respects to Elders past and present.