“Whether you call it a fitness trend or a mindfulness practice (or a bit of both), what exactly is forest bathing? The term emerged in Japan in the 1980s as a physiological and psychological exercise called shinrin-yoku (“forest bathing” or “taking in the forest atmosphere”). The purpose was twofold: to offer an eco-antidote to tech-boom burnout and to inspire residents to reconnect with and protect the country’s forests.

The Japanese quickly embraced this form of ecotherapy. In the 1990s, researchers began studying the physiological benefits of forest bathing, providing the science to support what we innately know: time spent immersed in nature is good for us. While Japan is credited with the term shinrin-yoku, the concept at the heart of the practice is not new. Many cultures have long recognized the importance of the natural world to human health.

Forest bathing is not just for the wilderness-lover; the practice can be as simple as walking in any natural environment and consciously connecting with what’s around you.” Sunny Fitzgerald, National Geographic – Read Full article

The forests of the 21st century will be valued most significantly for their natural beauty, biodiversity, flora and fauna habitat, passive recreation, bush walks, tracks and trails, clean water, as well as for their aesthetic, cultural and spiritual benefits.

We acknowledge the Aboriginal people as the Traditional Owners of this land and we pay our respects to Elders past and present.

The forests of the 21st century will be valued most significantly for their natural beauty, biodiversity, flora and fauna habitat, passive recreation, bush walks, tracks and trails, clean water, as well as for their aesthetic, cultural and spiritual benefits.

We acknowledge the Aboriginal people as the Traditional Owners of this land and we pay our respects to Elders past and present.